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A Taste That Reaches Deeply Into Our Collective Past

Do we humans share a collective memory for the particular way a food tastes?


Consider this: since antiquity, mankind has been perfecting the fine art of sausage making by curing, smoking and otherwise preserving meat.  We get our word “sausage” from the Latin word ‘salus,’ meaning salt, the first method of preservation.  The various classical techniques involved are now known as charcuterie. While Homer missed using the term by 2700 years - it slipped into the lexicon in 1858 - he was already writing about salting and smoking meats in his Odyssey, back in 850 B.C.  Given Ulysses’ travel schedule – as hectic as a modern day road warrior’s – it was a good thing this skill already existed, because it meant that he could safely eat the delicious, high-protein foods suited to his pay scale and elevated rank, while on the high seas.

Cut to the present, and the story of a modern day Odyssey.


Daniel Teboul, the inspiration behind Larchmont Charcuterie, grew up in the French Alps, skiing in the winter, hiking in the summer, and passing through countless remote mountain villages.  In France, meat curing is more a way of life than a pastime, and enduring local food traditions are passed on from generation to generation. None of what Daniel learned in his travels was lost, and he now brings this French artisanship and sensibility to the New World.  His creations have the authentic and earthy taste of saucisson that was dried in an Alpine barn at an altitude of 10,000 feet.  

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